Advanced Search
Browse Catalogues
AGRICULTURE
ANTHROPOLOGY / ETHNOGRAPHY
ARCHAEOLOGY
ARCHITECTURE
BANGLA
BIOGRAPHIES
BIOTECHNOLOGY
BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT
CHILDREN'S BOOKS
COMPUTER SCIENCE
COOKERY
CULTURE STUDIES
DEMOGRAPHY
DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
DISHA BOOKS
ECOLOGY
ECONOMICS
EDUCATION
ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
ENVIRONMENT AND BIODIVERSITY
FILM & MEDIA STUDIES
GENERAL BOOKS
GEOGRAPHY
HEALTH
HINDI
HISTORY
HUMAN RIGHTS
KANNADA
LAW
LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
MARATHI
MATHEMATICS
MEDICAL AND PARAMEDICAL
MIGRATION STUDIES
PHILOSOPHY
PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY
POLITICAL SCIENCE
POPULAR SCIENCE
REFERENCE
RELIGION
SCHOOL EDUCATIONAL BOOKS
SCHOOL LIBRARY
SOCIAL SCIENCE
SOCIOLOGY
WOMENS STUDIES
Counterflows to Colonialism: Indian Travellers and Settlers in Britain 1600-1857  
Michael H. Fisher
Price : 395.00
ISBN : 978-81-7824-154-8
Pages : 534
Binding : Paperback
Book Size : 140 x 216 mm
Year: 2006
Territorial Rights : World
Out of Stock
Counterflows to Colonialism: Indian Travellers and Settlers in Britain 1600-1857
  • The Book
  • Table of Contents
  • The Author(s)

About the Book

Indians have been visiting or settling in England since the early 1600s. Forming ‘counterflows’ to colonialism, Indians entered Britain, lived among Britons, and produced knowledge which compelled British responses. By the mid-nineteenth century several thousand Indian seamen, servants, scholars, soldiers, women and children, students, diplomats, royalty, merchants, tourists, and settlers were participating in varying ways within British society, depending on their gender, social origin, and personal circumstances. In multifarious and contested ways, their self-representations and activities influenced British attitudes and policies towards them as individuals and towards India generally. Some settled, but most returned to India after months or years living in Britain. Most also sent or brought back to India direct information about Britain which disseminated in complex ways within Indian society.

The context for these interactions and representations was colonialism and its processes, which powerfully altered what being ‘Indian’ meant, both culturally and legally. This book surveys and analyses the range of Indians that ventured to Britain over 250 years, their reasons for travel, their diverse lived experiences, and their contrasting representations of colonizer, colonized, and colonial rule. Written in lucid and jargon-free prose, this volume will enthral general readers as well as historians. Its strong interest in narrative and the telling anecdote, in individual personalities and peculiar lives, makes this book unusually appealing as much for its incredible wealth of new data and fresh arguments, as for its accessibility.

Table of Contents

Preface

Contributors (Author(s), Editor(s), Translator(s), Illustrator(s) etc.)

Michael H. Fisher is Danforth Professor of History at Oberlin College, USA. He has published extensively on interactions between Indians and Britons during the early colonial period, including a biography of one early Indian settler in Britain, Dean Mahomet (1759-1851), titled The First Indian Author in English.

About the Series